Hillary and The Donald

Hillary

I have a profound feeling that diatribes against Hillary Clinton have nothing really to do with Benghazi or the e-mail blunders (mistakes made also by others before her). Had an intelligent Republican (Is that an oxymoron nowadays?) done the same things, the mistakes would swiftly have been swept under the nearest rug followed by surprised expressions of dismay when asked to explain them. “What? That never happened.”

dairy-queen-donald

Since everyone else seems to be going on “gut feelings” in this election (i.e. the astonishing and irrational adoration for Donald Trump), I have to say that Hillary’s weakest point is that she is not a man. That’s public opinion, not mine. We have been a racist nation since the Civil War and a misogynistic one since before women got the vote. The deep resentment has never left some peoples’ psyches, because they feel those rights for Blacks and women are entitlements they should never have had in a male-dominated society that still snickers at the idea of a woman, however brilliant, experienced, and capable, could ever be Commander in Chief. The jokes still come too easily about her choice of eye make-up being more important than an international conference.  Colossally stupid remarks of misogynistic tone, however, don’t hide the fear in many faces of reactionary men (and even some women) who don’t want change to make progress that may be a threat to their happy years of napping in the comfy hammock of predictable  political outcomes, based solely upon what goes back to the 1600’s.

Capitol in DC

Many hyper-traditional males and females in government and in our nation see Hillary as a person of strength and defiance. That’s pretty scary stuff. They see her as an “uppity female” the way they saw Barak Obama as an uppity black man (I’m deleting the very ignorant other term left over from The Civil War and the aftermath of Carpetbaggers). I heard those comments from people I thought knew better, but I’ve learned that there are no limits to the fabricated tales of monumental hate and fear that come from our country  turning a new corner to see something better for more people and some folks feeling left behind in a fading historical perspective that no longer works as well as it used to.

White House

Nothing thus far in this election should have been a huge surprise to anyone. I have to remember that in my lifetime there were still diners in the South that refused to serve Blacks and wouldn’t even allow them to use drinking fountains hatefully and stupidly labeled “Whites Only.” The rest of the world has been watching us ever since, but there are still pockets of backward and unlettered people who defiantly refuse to acknowledge  people of darker skin color, and that includes accepting even black college professors, successful business men and women, not just the punks and gang bangers, who come in all colors anyway. The Rosa Parks battle was supposed to have ended sixty years ago, but there are still white folks, who feel threatened and angry by any success of citizens who happen to be black.

The America that frightens me is the one whose  voice comes from gullible people, who believe exactly what they want to believe. The number would probably terrify most of us.

Silly Hillary tabloid

I read on Facebook this morning a comment begging people not to buy Hillary’s hype. Should I buy Donald Trump’s instead? Every election has hype, but I want someone in the White House whom I won’t be embarrassed to call The Leader of the Western World, someone who knows the shenanigans of Washington first-hand and can get things done through savvy moves and sheer intelligence beyond  name-calling or closing a big deal for a golf course or is disinclined to share any of his tax returns. One of the big positive comments about Trump is that “He speaks his mind.” I’ve heard that a thousand times. By that logic, my Uncle Harvey who has Alzheimer’s and is in a nursing home blurting out anything that pops into his head to the occasional amusement of those around him, could be President, because he’s “honest and unfiltered.” Will Uncle Harvey withhold his tax returns too? Just saying.

punch and judy

Bernie Sanders was my first choice, because I believe he is the most honest, compassionate, energetic runner in this election. My second choice will be Hillary, not because she is my favorite person in America, but she knows what she’s doing on the world stage, which for the Trumpster seems to be nothing more than a puppet theater of Grand Guignol proportions. The Punch and Judy show is over now. I want someone I can take seriously in all aspects of government.    JB

About John

John Bolinger was born and raised in Northwest Indiana, where he attended Ball State University and Purdue University, receiving his BA and MA from those schools. Then he taught English and French for thirty-five years at Morton High School in Hammond, Indiana before moving to Colorado. He spends his winters in Pompano Beach, Florida. Besides COME SEPTEMBER, Journey of a High School Teacher, John's other books are ALL MY LAZY RIVERS, an Indiana Childhood, and COME ON, FLUFFY, THIS AIN'T NO BALLET, a Novel on Coming of Age, all available on Amazon.com as paperbacks and Kindle books. Alternately funny and touching, COME SEPTEMBER, conveys the story of every high school teacher’s struggle to enlighten both himself and his pupils, encountering along the way, battles with colleagues, administrators, and parents through a parade of characters that include a freshman boy for whom the faculty code name is “Spawn of Satan,” to a senior girl whose water breaks during a pop-quiz over THE LAST OF THE MOHICANS. Through social change and the relentless march of technology, the human element remains constant in the book’s personal, entertaining, and sympathetic portraits of faculty, students, parents, and others. The audience for this book will certainly include school teachers everywhere, teenagers, parents of teens, as well as anyone who appreciates that blend of humor and pathos with which the world of public education is drenched. The drive of the story is the narrator's struggle to become the best teacher he can be. The book is filled with advice for young teachers based upon experience of the writer, advice that will never be found in college methods classes. Another of John's recent books is Mum's the Word: Secrets of a Family. It is the story of his alcoholic father and the family's efforts to deal with or hide the fact. Though a serious treatment of the horrors of alcoholism, the book also entertains in its descriptions of the father during his best times and the humor of the family's attempts to create a façade for the outside world. All John's books are available as paperbacks and Kindle readers on Amazon, and also as paperbacks at Barnes & Noble. John's sixth and most recent book, Growing Old in America: Notes from a Codger was released on June 15, 2014.
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