Cuba’s Future

Colourful buildings in Havana.

Colorful buildings in Havana.

No Republican candidate for the presidency (not even The Trumpster) can raise my adrenalin and ire faster and more effectively than Ted Cruz. I don’t think there is an iota of sincerity in him, but he continues to twist issues enough to render himself a proverbial martyr in the political scheme of things, and of course, President Obama is generally the evil wizard at the castle door, ready to destroy Ted’s fantasy land of the 1950’s (assuming it ever really existed in the first place).

ted-cruz

On Saturday Cruz spoke at a campaign rally in Provo, Utah, slamming President Obama’s trip to Cuba on Sunday, claiming that a dangerous message was being sent to “political prisoners languishing in dungeons across the island.” Cruz went on to suggest that the Obamas would be rubbing elbows with only the elite rulers of the oppressed land. Though Cruz has not previously been very open about his Cuban heritage, he is suddenly telling the press about his Cuban immigrant father, “who was beaten and tortured during Batista’s regime” and the President’s visit would send only a message of approval to the Communist rulers who are still using oppression to deny basic human freedoms.

President Obama

Most of What Cruz said had little, if anything, to do with the President’s purpose, which is long term in bringing about some level of positive change for the Cuban people. What Cruz forgot in his ridiculous editing of Obama’s visit is that it isn’t really about Raul Castro, his brother Fidel, or about Batista, or any other dictator with no regard for humanity or individual rights. It is, however, ultimately about the Cuban people, about victims, reform, and compassion. Did Cruz expect the President to arrive with six-shooters ready for a gunfight at some corral?

This is a slow process, Mr. Cruz, one that has been tossed aside for the past fifty years, one that will require patience, diplomacy, and intelligence, all of which President Obama has in abundance. Get your story straight and stop editing everything the President does in order to make yourself look like some political savant or persecuted angel, neither of which you can ever be. Work instead on telling us something constructive you plan to do in order to make America and the world a better place. If you know so much about present conditions in Cuba, why aren’t you there with your people to help bring about change, and if you were to become President, what would YOU do? Please remember that snubbing our noses at the dictators is also a way of ignoring their people, people who need to be brought into the 21st Century, not by bombs and force, but with diplomacy of the most cunning kind.   JB

castro and obama

About John

John Bolinger was born and raised in Northwest Indiana, where he attended Ball State University and Purdue University, receiving his BA and MA from those schools. Then he taught English and French for thirty-five years at Morton High School in Hammond, Indiana before moving to Colorado. He spends his winters in Pompano Beach, Florida. Besides COME SEPTEMBER, Journey of a High School Teacher, John's other books are ALL MY LAZY RIVERS, an Indiana Childhood, and COME ON, FLUFFY, THIS AIN'T NO BALLET, a Novel on Coming of Age, all available on Amazon.com as paperbacks and Kindle books. Alternately funny and touching, COME SEPTEMBER, conveys the story of every high school teacher’s struggle to enlighten both himself and his pupils, encountering along the way, battles with colleagues, administrators, and parents through a parade of characters that include a freshman boy for whom the faculty code name is “Spawn of Satan,” to a senior girl whose water breaks during a pop-quiz over THE LAST OF THE MOHICANS. Through social change and the relentless march of technology, the human element remains constant in the book’s personal, entertaining, and sympathetic portraits of faculty, students, parents, and others. The audience for this book will certainly include school teachers everywhere, teenagers, parents of teens, as well as anyone who appreciates that blend of humor and pathos with which the world of public education is drenched. The drive of the story is the narrator's struggle to become the best teacher he can be. The book is filled with advice for young teachers based upon experience of the writer, advice that will never be found in college methods classes. Another of John's recent books is Mum's the Word: Secrets of a Family. It is the story of his alcoholic father and the family's efforts to deal with or hide the fact. Though a serious treatment of the horrors of alcoholism, the book also entertains in its descriptions of the father during his best times and the humor of the family's attempts to create a façade for the outside world. All John's books are available as paperbacks and Kindle readers on Amazon, and also as paperbacks at Barnes & Noble. John's sixth and most recent book, Growing Old in America: Notes from a Codger was released on June 15, 2014.
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